click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 25
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time with obama. the reason why i say it does a little bit, you have to have a conscience when you deal with anything. especially when you make decisions for other people than yourself, you have to have a conscience. w
four time a year. his office was in new york and in new jersey. when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut, sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and we would discuss some of the things that had not been able, but a certain amount of stuff i cannot pursue. -- could not pursue. >> did you ever get any insight on how watergate happen? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably 1992 or thereabout, he told me and indicated that john mitchell have thought so too, that this book that was coming out, "silenced coup," they thought that was probably some of what happened the guy " said mitchell on the cover on one of his editions that they thought this was sort of our happened. so i got that sense from nixon. practical back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it > how did your research and where did you have to go? how long a process? you talk about going all over the east coast, on the back. correct the principal thing i did was i had been interested in the revolution since i was a kid. i think i was probably eight or n
years. that being said, i think he took cruises over to the mediterranean, over to the new york. when the seas were rough, churchill insisted on watching the storm, being held there by four or five -- he described them -- as brown, burly, greek sailors. when they took their meals during those storms come they would sit on the floor with bottles of champagne between their knees. this 88, 90-year-old man -- well, not 90, but in his late 80's. he lived a very rich life. and of course, the second premier ship in the early 1950's. i think lady soames is correct and she knows her father. the last years were a slow descent. diana, the daughter, died of an overdose of barbiturates. he did not quite get it. by 88, 89, the christmas of 1964 they brought in fresh oysters and champagne. his private secretary was there. his children. christmas dinner lasted well into the 26th, and i think it was january 29 winter chill refused his brandy and cigars after dinner for the first time ever. he went into a coma and his doctor -- both doctors said, it is a question now if it is going to be a day. and it
dribbled in. they were rust buckets and virtually obsolete. which roosevelt told t"new york times" and congress. he said we gave them junk and we get six or seven caribbean naval bases from the empire. at one point that summer i believe churchill wrote a letter and asked roosevelt to declare war. that is how desperate he was. and so after a few brandies in t the co vilville diaries churchi says they want to us bleed to death and pick up everything that is left for free. at one point they were thinking around the dipper table of having everyone in england melt their wedding rings because it might raise $8 million or $10 million of gold and use that to buy american goods because it was all cash and carry, to shame the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he interested in? what is in his head. try to place churchill in his tim times. he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of the geography, the politics, the milita
office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut or sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and some of the things that had not been the school -- had not been discussedable before. >> did you ever get in setting to watergate and how that happened? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably in 1992 or thereabouts. he told me and he indicated that john mitchell thought so, too, that this book that was coming out, "silent coup" -- do you remember that one? that was probably some of what happened. he quoted mitchell on the cover. they thought that this was sort of how it happened. so i got that sense from him. >> going back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it to? how did your research it? how do have to go? -- how did you have to go? >> i have been interested in the revolution since there was a little kid. i was probably eight or nine when i would make a list of generals. i did nothing that was heading for anything very useful, but i always enjoyed that. th
good friend from rochester new york, the distinguished ranking minority member of the committee on rules, ms. slaughter. pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dreier: all time will be yielded for debate purposes only. i would like to ask, mr. speaker, unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i was just thinking about the fact that there are 26 letters in the alphabet, and we have had the first three letters used in discussion here on the house floor today. a, b, and my friend from worcester brought up the letter c in talking about this. we have what is so-called letter b. and i'm not doing a "sesame street" skit here. letter b is what we are talking about, plan b, and i think about plan a. plan a is what the majority in the house of representatives has been trying for the last two years to implement
" is the headline in "the wall street journal." host: that story from inside "usa today." this is from "the new york times." host: there is this from "roll call." pessimistic asstima ever. the president summoning congressional leaders. we expect there will be a stakeout afterward. we may hear from the president and we will be following all of that as the day unfolds. it's begin with david lightman. he covers capitol hill and the white house. the best sense of what you think the dynamics will be inside the room at the 3:00 p.m. meeting. guest: for all this talk of pessimism and optimism, the only people that know are the five principles in that room and i think that is important. they are all seasoned negotiators. they went to the debt ceiling stuff a year and a half ago. i think there will make an honest effort to get this thing resolved. i am not as pessimistic as others. we have seen this go to the brink before. why would you give up anything until you have to is the old saw. you have to be braced for an anything. host: the president is getting higher taxes if we go over the cliff and he can go ba
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
[applause] sandy. new york? to place it in a modern context, we have to turn to proxy data like coral and ice to piece together the puzzle of how the climate buried in the distant past. it showed it was relatively warm. it was about a thousand years ago. recently that exceeded anything we have seen. it was featured in the summary for policy makers in 2001. when it became an icon, those who find the science inconvenient saw the need to try to discredit this graph. they saw discrediting me as a way to do that. some have been attacked for the work they have done. i was also bill of five. my book tells the story of what it is like to be a scientist and find yourself in voluntary and accidental public figure. i was put in the limelight in limelight. [laughter] stick metaphor -- >> yes. that, if we as scientists are talking to the right people. reflag that we would not tell you but for fear that you might >> you are relatively new todid you know what you're getting a career in atmospheric change? having studied under steven the public scrutiny. 98%. the backlash. >> what happened? there was an incr
headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york, and a woman thought this was really cute, and she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsey, and got a start on my political career making the case against the opponent as well. she gave me a white box with strings that looked to be pastries, and we opened it up, and there were all of these doughnuts in a wad of $10 bills. my first lesson in politics, the district leaders said you could keep the doughnuts. >> and david axelrod tonight, 8:0 p.m., -- 8:00 p.m. with -- on c-span. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what is the most important issue he should consider? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, made a short video. >> it is your chance to win a grand prize of $5,000. $50,000 in total prize is. for more information, go to student cam.corg -- .prg. first lady michelle obama and chefs how the demonstration at the white house dining room. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> are you excited? very nice
. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks do
and went on to study elsewhere. she debuted at the metropolitan opera house in new york in 1995. she has performed on four continents and song with all the greats in the industry. "the new york times" said this. "she has a classic voice with a wide range. from her low voice to her top notes, she is a compelling stage actress. if anything, she underestimates her charisma." the critic noted that his favorite moment was after her arrest, sitting on a table with her hands tied behind her back, she slowly lifted her skirt above her knees with her teeth. he wrote that from that moment, she had the audience enthralled. thank you both for being here. >> i have just had knee surgery. we were at the kennedy center honors. my husband said it will be difficult to lift your skirt with your teeth. >> i want to start with a question for both of you. was there one person who was your mentor role model and inspired you to be where you are now? >> i started off in the magazine industry. i cannot say i had a mentor early on. the person who inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" mag
with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was hosted by the forth sity's john dan center. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale
. it was a film about death and the civil war. i went with the filmmaker, ken burns, to antietam, new york, washington. people want to talk about these ideas. there is a huge appetite for what is war? how do we understand this? i felt this was an example vacation for me as to what the humanities can be and do. i embrace what you say. i worry about the decline in humanity concentrators even in institutions like ours. there are some places where the humanities are expendable when we have to constrained resources. i think we do ourselves a terrible disservice as a country. it does not focus on how to get where it needs to go but knows where it ought to be going. that is a fundamental obligation. >> a great ending to a great panel. thank you. [applause] i'm now going to invite al hunt to come up and introduces panel. in the last session i said gene sperling would be joining us after this discussion. he was in the midst of the fiscal cliff negotiations, so hopefully he will tell us how he is protecting these important investments. >> next, a conversation about spurring investment in the marketp
. southern england was in debt. now is the obvious. -- it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in certification plus. -- in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for -- are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society
because the technology changed. there is a magnetic tape. you have to go to chicago or new york to record. i'm an old-fashioned guy. i still want all those kids to come to a seminar on a campus. i am teaching a course next year and i'm trying to figure how to get my 50-minute chunks -- 15-minute chunks. we have a question there. >> i'm carol thompson. i have a question for each of the three panelists. we have been talking about what we were hoping for the future. what are your greatest fears and greatest hopes for 2016 and 2020? it is a small question. >> i presume you don't think the world will end december 21. >> susan will not say newt gingrich will run again. >> did not come to me first on this one. >> wow, my greatest fear? i hope my kids are well employed. they are doing ok. they are in their 20's. my greatest fear -- i do not think about fears. i'm surrounded by so many incredible kids that i feel good. if i feel bad in the morning, i feel good after my class. >> you stole my thunder. >> i prefer the thunder over the heat. >> a couple of things. then, in looks like we're running ou
and the big states, new york, california, and illinois, would have to much influence of a think there is a balance. others think that sent the candidates primarily go to these battleground states where it is too close to call to make up the 270 electoral college votes, that the other states get ignored and it suppresses turnout of therefore it is not good for democracy. so, there have been many amendments over the years. not many recently. they stopped in 1979. there was only one attempted to build this last session, 113th congress, did not go anywhere. many amendments attempted -- many states have innovations which we can talk about later if you like. to change the way they count the votes. host: let's go to the phones and go to casey from atlanta, georgia. caller: good morning. and good morning to your guest. guest: good morning. caller: i believe that this conversation is so enlightening and informative. professor thurber can certainly -- i believe 1988, in the state of west virginia, there was a democratic elector that was pledged for the democratic nominee, governor dukakis
groups. >> an article in the "new york times" referenced the rape capital of the world comment, and he asked the question, what strategic purpose is there of putting an ak-47 assault rifle inside a woman and pulling the trigger or cutting out a woman's fetus and making her friends eat it? the government's response has been a shrug. that is diabolical. and yet, we are funding on a yearly basis $480 million into this country that allows this horrendous abuse to go on. it appears we do it with full knowledge of the extent of these rapes, and we're not holding them accountable. it is like giving an addict more dope. how do we justify it? >> the funding the defense department is providing is for the training and education that would instill discipline to prevent this very kind of horrific behavior. it is absolutely unacceptable. the funding but supported for specific programming to prevent this from happening from the congolese military. the rebel groups, that is another problem. there is outrageous and unacceptable things happening. our programs are aimed to ensure that does not happen. >
, even though he was only six, jack was a new york giants fan. in the days to come, many of the classmes will also be laid to rest, victims of this tragedy too terrible to comprehend. 20 little girls and boys, 20 tineie daughters and sons, sisters, brothers, friends and playmates. 20 children will never grow up to learn to drive, go on that first date, or graduate from high school. 26 -- i'm sorry, mr. president -- 20 six and seven-year-olds will never have the chai tons fall in love, get married or have children of their own. noah, jack, charlotte, dylan, madeleine, kath reconciliation bill, chase, jessie, grace, care line, jessica, allison, and james. no words of condolence could possibly ease the pain of families who lost cherished little children. but i hope it's some small comfort that the entire nation mourns with them. my heart, my warm wishes go out to all of those affected by friday's massacre. my thoughts are with the students and faculty of sandy hook who witnessed the violence. newtown and the nation have seen great evil, but we've also seen incredible bravely. in her mine fi
to new york hospital earlier today. according to the state department, her doctors discovered a blood clot stemming from the concussion he sustained weeks ago. she is being treated with anti coagulants. doctors will monitor her condition. >> next, we will hear from members of congress about negotiants surrounding the fiscal cliff. senate majority leader harry reid, followed by senator john thune, then senate floor speeches from barbara boxer, joe manchin, and kay bailey hutchinson. >> the majority leader is recognized. i was glad to hear that republicans have taken their demand for social security benefit cuts off the table. it should never have >> they should never have been on the table to begin with. at 11:00 in the morning. i certainly hope >> next, republican senator john thune. >> thank you. i will first of all thank both of my colleagues for the diligent work -- they have committed themselves to this work and i appreciate it. mr. president, i rise today frustrated, embarrassed, and angry. it is absolutely inexcusable that all of us find ourselves in this place at this time, sta
. secretary of state hillary clinton was admitted to a new york hospital on sunday. according to the state department, doctors discovered a blood clot stemming from the concussion he sustained several weeks ago. she is being treated with an anticoagulant and doctors will continue to monitor her condition to see which ferc -- whether for the treatment is needed. coming up on c-span, members of congress talk about negotiations surrounding the fiscal cliff. senate majority leader harry reid, speeches on the senate floor from california democrat barbara boxer, west virginia senator joe mansion, texas republican kay bailey hutchison and then caucus leaders speak to reporters. r is recognized. mr. reid: thank you very much, mr. president. i was really gratified to hear the republicans have taken their demand for social security benefit cuts off the table. the truth ishey should never have been on the table to begin with. there is still significant distance between the two sides, but negotiations continue. there is still time left to reach an agreement, and we intend to continue negotiations. i a
't have virginia or new york, it wouldn't work. so it came about one of the great informal agreements in american legal history, there was an agreement, an informal agreement, that if the constitution were ratified as written bit 1787 convention, that there would be a bill of rights. and the statesmen, and there were statesmen in those days, kept their word so we had a bill of rights in 1791. and the result is we have a hamiltonian structure and jeffersonian bill of rights. and let me mention a few things about each of those. insofar as structure, they are different structures but one of the principal ones is separation of powers and checks and balances. we use those terms often interchangeably, separation of powers and checks and balances but they actually have a different thrust. separation of powers. teaches each brafrpbl of the government has a certain autonomy to act on its own. checks and balances works the other way around. checks and balances indicates the government cannot of course operate unless the branches interact with each other. there's a certain newtonian metaphor to
vice chairman of the democratic caucus, mr. crowley from new york. >> first -- thank you. i appreciate that round of applause. let me thank both john and javier for including me in this press conference and for welcoming me to the leadership of the house of the democratic caucus. i'm very pleased to be here at this very important moment in time in our nation's history as well. i agree with both john, javier, and i should say as well with tim walz and i won't steal your thunder, tim, what you do today is important not only i think for we as a caucus in terms of setting where we are at but i think also a strong message that the american people sent almost a month ago had a they want to see this congress working to get things done. they re-elected the president. the president ran on an agenda of giving a tax break to 98% of the american people, and that opportunity is before us. the senate has worked their will. it's now our opportunity to do that before the holiday season is over. the expression time is fleeting has never been more apropos than it is today. we have very few working days
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)